Letter to Parents

I’m excited to be teaching several Integrated Humanities courses, as well as Apologetics, at Logos Online School this year! I sent out this letter to the parents of my students, and thought it might be helpful for others who want know more about our approach to education. Thank you for honoring us with the opportunityContinue reading “Letter to Parents”

Teaching History with “Affectionate Realism”

As I finish up my PhD through the Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam on communion frequency in Reformed churches, I’m starting to take notes on another research project. It’s focused on how Christianity has impacted society, and how the Gospel has transformed cultures. I’m not leaving behind my decades of research into worship and the Lord’sContinue reading “Teaching History with “Affectionate Realism””

Why Teach Our Children Rhetoric?

What does the word “rhetoric” mean to you? Most people associate “rhetoric” with words that are big, showy, or empty, fake, and manipulative. Why would we want to teach our children how to use words to manipulate people? As an online teacher at Kepler Education who teaches Rhetoric, I’d like to submit that rhetoric isContinue reading “Why Teach Our Children Rhetoric?”

Why Study Logic?

I’m really enjoying starting a year long study of Introductory Logic with a fantastic group of students at Kepler Education! But, you might wonder if we really need to study Logic? In his wonderful book, Socratic Logic, the eminent Christian philosopher Peter Kreeft gives several compelling reasons to study Logic. Here’s a sampling of theContinue reading “Why Study Logic?”

Leadership & Hope for the Future

I just picked up David McCullough’s Pulitzer Prize winning-biography of John Adams, our 2nd president and one of the key leaders in birth of the United States of America. As we prepare to celebrate our nation’s founding, even in the middle of chaos, confusion, and heart-ache, it’s helpful to learn about what inspired leaders likeContinue reading “Leadership & Hope for the Future”

Why Study the Medieval Period?

In chaotic times, we search for direction. What do you do in the middle of a pandemic? Riots? Racial strife and wars? A collapsing economy? Christians have been through all of this before. This is one of the main reasons we should study history. We realize that, though our times are full of trials andContinue reading “Why Study the Medieval Period?”

What’s the Point of Education?

As I ramp up to begin teaching a number of online classes for Kepler Education, I’ll be posting thoughts and musings on the nature of education, especially classical Christian education. These are mostly posts for myself, to remind me of why I’m a teacher. Why do I get up every morning, excited to teach youngContinue reading “What’s the Point of Education?”

Chesterton on Modern Science & Morality

“There is one aspect of modern science and machinery that nobody has noticed. It is quite new, and it is enormously important. It is this; that the very fact of using new methods makes it easier to fall back on old morals, especially if they are very immoral morals.” These prescient words came from theContinue reading “Chesterton on Modern Science & Morality”

Kepler Education

I’m excited to be part of the team at Kepler Education! Kepler is a new consortium of independent teachers offering online classes for students 7-12. Kepler offers a wide variety of courses in the classical Christian tradition, with an emphasis on the liberal arts. You can choose which teachers/classes fit your family’s needs and schedule.Continue reading “Kepler Education”

Training the Next Generation of Reformers

Martin Luther did not mean to start the Reformation. In 1517, Luther, a teacher of theology in Germany, posted some items for an academic discussion on the church door in Wittenberg (really a community bulletin board back then). At this point in his career, he had no intention to break away from the Roman CatholicContinue reading “Training the Next Generation of Reformers”